Lotte Egtberts

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw

10.07.2020 – 30.08.2020
Exhibition at SEA Foundation, Tilburg, NL
Participating artists: Sabine de Graaf, Lisette de Greeuw, Zhang Peng, Risja Steeghs


Co-curated by me and Michaela Davidova, WARP shows four different (regional) artists in the vitrine at SEA Foundation, Tilburg. WARP aims to interlink SEA Foundation’s focus on international cooperation with a portfolio of regional artists, resulting in a fabric made through collaboration, experiment, skills and trust. The 2020 WARP programme is supported by the Mondriaan Fund.

I personally invited artist Lisette de Greeuw (1990, lives and works in Ghent) to show her work at WARP. The works of Lisette de Greeuw are characterised by an impressive amount of detailed signs. With her work, de Greeuw tries to organise and give meaning to her thoughts, analyses and other information patterns. She shapes these thought patterns through invented systems that become increasingly complex and nuanced as she repeats them.

Her very meticulous drawings are reminiscent of embroidery and knitting patterns. Notation Language, for example, consists of a grid filled with precise hand-drawn signs, each representing a colour. This allows the work to be 'translated' into a coloured version. Her drawings do not represent a visual reality, but demonstrate an invented system that can be read and translated. In this way, she refers to language as a communication system that is not always sufficient, and where things sometimes go lost in translation. What will be lost and what will be gained if we keep on translating? The viewer plays an important role in this, as they interpret the schematic drawing and maybe add things, or leaves things out.

Lisette de Greeuw's work stands in a long tradition in which the art of weaving has paved the way for the now so important programming language. Where a binary computer code consists of zeros and ones, a woven piece of textile is constructed from the vertical warp and horizontal weft. The domain of the logical programming language is nowadays mainly seen as something 'masculine', but its basis lies in the 'feminine' textile tradition. This connection can be seen in the work of de Greeuw, who studied both textile art and discrete mathematics.


Read more about Lisette de Greeuw’s work here

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw, 2020, installation shot © Michaela Davidova

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw, 2020, installation shot © Michaela Davidova

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw, 2020, mediation text

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw, 2020, installation shot © Michaela Davidova

WARP #2: Lisette de Greeuw, 2020